Still Think CHEMTRAILS Are Folklore? Read This!

On September 20, 1950, a US Navy ship just off the coast of San Francisco used a giant hose to spray a cloud of microbes into the air and into the city’s famous fog. The military was testing how a biological weapon attack would affect the 800,000 residents of the city.

The people of San Francisco had no idea.

The Navy continued the tests for seven days, potentially causing at least one death. It was one of the first large-scale biological weapon trials that would be conducted under a “germ warfare testing program” that went on for 20 years, from 1949 to 1969. The goal “was to deter [the use of biological weapons] against the United States and its allies and to retaliate if deterrence failed,” the government explained later. “Fundamental to the development of a deterrent strategy was the need for a thorough study and analysis of our vulnerability to overt and covert attack.”

Of the 239 known tests in that program, San Francisco was notable for two reasons, according to Dr. Leonard Cole, who documented the episode in his book “Clouds of Secrecy: The Army’s Germ Warfare Tests Over Populated Areas.”

Cole, now the director of the Terror Medicine and Security Program at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, tells Business Insider that this incident was “notable: first, because it was really early in the program … but also because of the extraordinary coincidence that took place at Stanford Hospital, beginning days after the Army’s tests had taken place.”

Hospital staff were so shocked at the appearance of a patient infected with a bacteria, Serratia marcescens, that had never been found in the hospital and was rare in the area, that they published an article about it in a medical journal. The patient, Edward Nevin, died after the infection spread to his heart.

S. marcescens was one of the two types of bacteria the Navy ship had sprayed over the Bay Area.

It wasn’t until the 1970s that Americans, as Cole wrote in the book, “learned that for decades they had been serving as experimental animals for agencies of their government.”

San Francisco wasn’t the first or the last experiment on citizens who hadn’t given informed consent.

Other experiments involved testing mind-altering drugs on unsuspecting citizens. In one shocking, well-known incident, government researchers studied the effects of syphilis on black Americans without informing the men that they had the disease — they were told they had “bad blood.” Researchers withheld treatment after it became available so they could continue studying the illness, despite the devastating and life-threatening implications of doing so for the men and their families.

But it was the germ warfare tests that Cole focused on.

“All these other tests, while terrible, they affected people counted in the hundreds at most,” he says. “But when you talk about exposing millions of people to potential harm, by spreading around certain chemicals or biological agents, the quantitative effect of that is just unbelievable.”

“Every one of the [biological and chemical] agents the Army used had been challenged” by medical reports, he says, despite the Army’s contention in public hearings that they’d selected “harmless simulants” of biological weapons.

“They’re all considered pathogens now,” Cole says.

Here are some of the other difficult-to-believe germ warfare experiments that occurred during this dark chapter in US history. These tests were documented in Cole’s book and verified by Business Insider using congressional reports and archived news articles.

The miilitary tested how a biological or chemical weapon would spread throughout the country by spraying bacteria as well as various chemical powders — including an especially controversial one called zinc cadmium sulfide. Low flying airplanes would take off, sometimes near the Canadian border, “and they would fly down through the Midwest,” dropping their payloads over cities, says Cole.

These sprays were tested on the ground too, with machines that would release clouds from city rooftops or intersections to see how they spread.

In the book, Cole cites military reports that documented various Minneapolis tests, including one where chemicals spread through a school. The clouds were clearly visible.

To prevent suspicion, the military pretended that they were testing a way to mask the whole city in order to protect it. They told city officials that “the tests involved efforts to measure ability to lay smoke screens about the city” to “hide” it in case of nuclear attack, according to Cole’s account.

The potential toxicity of that controversial compound zinc cadmium sulfide is debated. One component, cadmium, is highly toxic and can cause cancer. Some reports suggest a possibility that the zinc cadmium sulfide could perhaps degrade into cadmium, but a 1997 report from the National Research Council concluded that the Army’s secret tests “did not expose residents of the United States and Canada to chemical levels considered harmful.” However, the same report noted that research on the chemical used was sparse, mostly based on very limited animal studies.

These air tests were conducted around the country as part of Operation Large Area Coverage.

“There was evidence that the powder after it was released would be then located a day or two later as far away as 1,200 miles,” Cole says. “There was a sense that you could really blanket the country with a similar agent.” Source businessinsider

Texas Resident ZIKA POSITIVE After Returning From MIAMI

In the first Zika case in Texas linked to trip within U.S., a Texas resident who recently traveled to Miami has tested positive for Zika.

The El Paso County recently returned from an area of Miami where local transmission by U.S. mosquitoes has occurred. It is also the first Zika case for the county, which has found no other evidence of the virus or local transmission.

BEST Zika Mosquito Repellents

There have been 108 cases of travel-related Zika in Texas, including three pregnant women and one person who had sexual contact with a traveler, health officials said. Continue reading

Son Of Late D.C. Mayor Marion Barry DEAD At 36

The son of the late D.C. mayor, Marion Barry, has died. He was 36.

Marion Christopher Barry passed away after an apparent drug overdose, according to his family. He was transported to a hospital where he was pronounced dead early Saturday morning.

Marion Christopher Barry

No official cause of death has been announced but family members told NBC News 4 he took a fatal overdose. Continue reading

Zika Virus STRIKES Yellowstone County Montana

The fourth known case of the Zika virus has been identified in Yellowstone County. The infection was identified by the RiverStone Health and the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services.

The reported case in Montana, the first of its kind, was found in a man who had travelled to an affected area. In February, Missoula County reported the first travel related case of Zika in Montana.

BEST Zika Mosquito Repellents

As of July 27, 2016 there have been 1,658 confirmed cases of Zika in the United States. Nearly all cases were travel related. Diagnosis of Zika is based on a person’s recent travel history, symptoms, and results from a blood or urine test. h/t billingsgazette

Zika is a disease caused by a virus that is spread primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species of mosquito that is not found in Montana. Travelers returning from Zika affected areas who have symptoms, or who are pregnant, or who are planning a pregnancy, should consult their healthcare provider.

Grammy Winning Musician Contracts ZIKA VIRUS Cancels Drake Fest Performance

Beenie Man, who won a Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album, was forced to cancel his co-headlining performance at Drake’s OVO Festival in Toronto Saturday night after contracting the Zika virus.

Beenie was scheduled to perform alongside Machel Montano at the popular festival but was denied entry into Canada a few days before the event over “immigration issues” related to his contraction of the virus.

beanie man zika

The Jamaican artist shared a photo of himself on social media holdup in the hospital. In the caption he apologized to fans for missing the festival. Continue reading

Forbes Publicly SHAMES Robert De Niro: You Are Harming Autistic Children And Their Familes!

Forbes is attempting to publicly shame acting legend, Robert De Niro in an effort to get him pull the pull on “Vaxxed,” a film about the possible link between vaccines and autism, slated to premier at his Tribeca Film Festival.

The Forbes hit piece, titled, “Robert DeNiro [sic] Just Broke My Heart,” claims De Niro has “destroyed his legacy by choosing to feature a film that will only bring great harm to millions of families, a film that harms public understanding of autism and autistic people by misleading the public about vaccines.”

Robert DeNiro autistic

As long as I can remember, I have loved Robert DeNiro. Certainly, most of his films weren’t appropriate for me to watch as a child, but my dad enjoyed his films and I’d therefore often see him on TV even before I came to appreciate his movies on my own. Continue reading

Woman 112 Smokes 2 Packs Of Cigarettes a Day For 95 Years

A 112-year-old woman in Nepal has defied the odds by smoking 30 cigarettes a day for the past 95 years.

Batuli Lamichhane says she’s been smoking for over 9 decades. She is just over 3 years shy of being the oldest person in the world.

Batuli Lamichhane smoking

Instead of holding a cigarette with her index and middle finger, Lamichhane uses her entire right fist Continue reading

Some In Flint Think The Lead Water Crisis Is A Hoax

Via The Salt Lake Tribune: Even as authorities are still advising residents in Flint, Mich., not to drink or bathe in the city’s tap water, leaving thousands to rely on bottled water to survive, some of the state’s prominent political voices think Flint’s water crisis may be exaggerated.

Foremost among them is Oakland County Republican Executive L. Brooks Patterson, who voiced skepticism about the severity of the crisis during an appearance before the Detroit Economic Club luncheon Tuesday, according to the Detroit Free Press.

L. Brooks Patterson flint

“I don’t think we should say or use words anymore like ‘Flint’s been poisoned,’ ” Patterson told reporters. “Because I don’t think that’s accurate. I’ve been using words like ‘Flint’s been poisoned,’ and I won’t use that anymore because I think the jury is out,” he added. Continue reading

Chipotle Stock Plummets As 3 New States Report Dozens Of E. Coli Cases

The CDC announced on Friday that three additional states have reported E. coli cases of the same strain as the Chipotle outbreak. California, Minnesota, New York and Ohio join Washington State and Oregon in the fast food health crisis.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said another 45 people became sickened with the E. coli outbreak strain after eating at Chipotle.

Chipotle Salmonella Minnesota

Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. CMG, -8.75% shares dropped in Friday trading after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported more cases of E. coli infection related to the burrito chain. Continue reading